The Elite et al. vs. Trump et al

elitevstramp

December 13, 2016

I thought I’d never write about current events at Free-Man’s Perspective. My interests lie in human development, not in the daily crap-fights of politics. Recent events, however, have forced me to reconsider.

What finally changed my mind was a story that broke Friday evening in which the CIA claims Russia intervened in the US election, because Putin wanted Trump to win and Hillary to lose. The story was subsequently reported far and wide.

There are several serious problems with this story. First of all, it’s another in a well-promoted and international series of stories on “fake news.” Even the Pope has chimed in on this, using shocking (disgusting) terms. People with serious influence are behind these stories, and that’s unsettling.

Second, this was supposedly a “secret CIA report.” And that, my good reader, is simply BS. The only truly “leaked” reports come to us via Wikileaks, Anonymous, or underground groups of that sort. “CIA leaks” that come to you via the Washington Post are simply things the CIA wants you to see. You wanna bet there’s no whistleblower hiding in Russia over this one?

Let me put it this way: If the FBI and CIA don’t hunt down the person who divulged this “secret report,” it was an authorized release. You’re being misled on purpose.

Now, getting back to the story, let’s note that there is zero evidence given. Just “it was a secret report, trust us.” Not one of the “officials” is named.

It should also be noted that Julian Assange has flatly denied that Russia was the source of the leaks. And Assange, unlike 99% of all Washington, has a reputation for truth-telling.

There were earlier reports blaming Russia for the Wikileaks hacks, and they, likewise, provided zero evidence. They say things like “consistent with Russian methods,” implying, it would seem, that Russia has some kind of patent on hacking techniques. They expect us to believe that Putin’s crews run their hacks from Russian companies and Russian IP addresses.

Let me be clear on this: No actual Russian hacker would attack from a Russian address. Furthermore, Russian hackers have no exclusive methods that other hackers couldn’t use. Those who imply such things are counting on you being too ignorant to see through their BS and too blinded by authority to question them.

Where’s This Going?

This is what scares me. What we’re seeing is an elite class unable to complete their revolution. Brexit, Trump, Renzi’s Italian loss, and other events have turned the tide against mindless Western obedience. People no longer trust their “news outlets,” and average people are coming to realize that the elites are malignant. This is the actual reason for all the stories of “fake news.”

Perhaps the Washington Post’s new story was published to undermine Trump’s legitimacy, so he’s easier to dispose of as soon as he does something unpopular. Or perhaps the goal is to get very nasty and manipulate the electoral college, which meets December 19.

At a minimum, this is a setup for a war between Trump and the CIA. In response to the story, Donald Trump did what you’d expect him to do; he lashed back. A statement from the Trump Transition Team reads, “These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction.” And you can bet Donald won’t forget this episode.

Wars between the White House and the CIA, however, are scary by themselves. The last president to turn against the CIA was John F. Kennedy.

* * * * *

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  • Such a tour de force, so many ideas. And I am amazed at the courage to write such a book, that challenges so many people’s conceptions.

  • There were so many points where it was hard to read, I was so choked up.

  • Holy moly! I was familiar with most of the themes presented in A Lodging of Wayfaring Men, but I am still trying to wrap my head around the concepts you presented at the end of this one.

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* * * * *

Paul Rosenberg
www.freemansperspective.com

When Elite Privilege Breaks

privilegebreaks

Finding parallels with Rome is a fun topic for writers, and just recently I came across some very interesting ones. They grabbed my attention, and they may grab yours as well.

These passages (in bold) are from The Rise of Western Christendom: Triumph and Diversity, A.D. 200-1000, by Peter Brown:

[E]mperor, military, and civilian populations alike needed the idea of a “barbarian threat” to justify their own existence.

Just as our grand states need terrorists to justify their existence, immigrants to threaten the populace, and outsiders to blame.

Note also that the “civilian populations” required a barbarian threat. That directly translates to today’s defense workers, intel agency workers, militarized police forces, and all the millions who’ve merged their identity with “our heroic protectors.” With no big threat, all of that becomes meaningless.

The peasantry had to increase production so as to earn the money with which to pay taxes.

Have you noticed how obsessively young people work these days? People talk about Millennial slackers, and there are some, but I see young families where both parents have to work full time, who work on their smart phones long after business hours, and who are taxed to the hilt without remorse.

My complaint with these millions is not that they’re slackers; it’s that they’re allowing themselves to be driven too hard. They shouldn’t take the abuse they do. They are working harder than their parents did… too hard.

Rome slowly lost its grip on the imagination and on the value systems of the inhabitants of the empire and their neighbors in the course of the fifth and early sixth centuries.

This is going on now. Who still believes in politicians as virtuous leaders? As noble statesmen? Who believes that school systems are serving the citizens rather than themselves? Who doesn’t have horror stories to tell about the police?

And how many people in other countries believe in the God-ordained, virtuous United States?

To the extent that Hollywood informs our imaginations, our Rome is holding on, but only because it more or less controls Hollywood. And that may fail as well; cracks may already be appearing.

[T]here was one thing the fourth-century Roman state did well, which was to extract money from its subjects.

This one is interesting, because while it’s true that our Rome is superb at skimming money from its subjects, it gets an equal or greater amount through what we can call for simplicity’s sake “money printing.” Rome couldn’t do that.

The collection of taxes offered unparalleled opportunities for enrichment for landowners, tax collectors, and bureaucrats. What was gathered through taxes was redistributed at the top, in the form of gifts and salaries paid in solid gold. This process created a swaggering new class….

Can you say, “top one or two percent”? And note that the money was “redistributed at the top,” precisely as now. Redistribution goes to the first hands at the spigot of printed money; to Wall Street, being the one and only destination for investments; and to those who purchase favors from the state. These people have indeed formed “a swaggering new class.”

So, putting all of these together, we get:

  • Fears, manufactured or otherwise, to keep the state thriving.

  • People overworking themselves to keep up with the burdens placed upon them.

  • People who no longer believe the myth of the glorious state and its righteous leaders.

  • States that excel only at stripping money from its masses and (now) creating it out of thin air.

  • Stripping the masses to redistribute money at the top, thus creating a new, luxury-purchasing class.

I think those are rather interesting parallels. And so are the consequences that followed:

[W]e end, around the year 600 A.D., with a world of smaller units, ruled by low-pressure states.

Decentralization, in other words; in my opinion a very good thing.

[T]he villas of the West had been turned into farmhouses.

Notice that the “elite dwellings” were now being turned into working buildings and non-elite dwellings. When centralization and enforced privilege break down, non-elite people return to prosperity.

[I]n one way, the barbarian invasions and the civil wars of the early fifth century did prove decisive. They broke the spine of the empire as a tax-gathering machine.

Here again, I think of money printing rather than tax gathering only. And if the fraying of our “empire” results in “breaking the spine” of money printing and tax gathering, many of us will be thrilled. And given that these systems can only remain intact if the populace is mindlessly compliant, breaking them may not be as difficult as it seems.

Within a century, they had overturned one of the “pillars of bigness” on which not only the court and the army, but the economy and the high pitched social structure of the later Roman empire [sic], had depended.

The pillars of bigness: One nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all, and so on. This self-congratulatory myth needs to be overturned if we ever hope to live in a sane, just world. So does “we’re the biggest badass on the planet.”

[I]f anyone was happy in the early Middle Ages, it was the peasantry. Freed at last from the double pressure of landlords and tax collectors, they settled back to enjoy a low-profile golden age.

As I’ve detailed in the subscription letter, the so-called “Dark Ages” were a period of liberation for non-elite people.

And how might we – the peasantry, the people of flyover country – feel about a world without tax collectors, money-scammers, and self-righteous oppressors? I think most of us would welcome it as a golden age.

So, there you have them. I’m not saying that all these parallels will turn out precisely this way, but they do make a very interesting model to work from.

* * * * *

A book that generates comments like these, from actual readers, might be worth your time:

  • I just finished reading The Breaking Dawn and found it to be one of the most thought-provoking, amazing books I have ever read… It will be hard to read another book now that I’ve read this book… I want everyone to read it.

  • Such a tour de force, so many ideas. And I am amazed at the courage to write such a book, that challenges so many people’s conceptions.

  • There were so many points where it was hard to read, I was so choked up.

  • Holy moly! I was familiar with most of the themes presented in A Lodging of Wayfaring Men, but I am still trying to wrap my head around the concepts you presented at the end of this one.

Get it at Amazon ($18.95) or on Kindle: ($5.99)

TheBreakingDawn

* * * * *

Paul Rosenberg
www.freemansperspective.com

Could the Elite Survive Without Terrorism?

withoutterrorism

I’ve been long struck by a comment attributed to Adolph Hitler: “If there were no Jews, we’d have to invent them.”((Which it seems he did say, though in a slightly different form.)) This callous sentiment lies at the heart of rulership, including the rulers of our day. Power needs a frightening enemy. The systems that be, after all, are wholly organized around our fears. Without something to be terribly afraid of, the core justification for rulership fails.

Think of it this way: If we didn’t have scary things to fear – if politics operated on reason – our overlords couldn’t get half the compliance they get now. That’s why they market everything that matters to them through fear. Because, as I’ve been saying over and over, fear makes humans behave stupidly; and in particular, it makes them comply with ridiculous things without reason.

If you actually examine it, the saying, “Never let a crisis go to waste,” it’s just another way of saying, “Get the suckers to go along with you while they’re still afraid.”

To put it simply: Nothing bigger than a barebones government could survive if people made the decision to accept or reject policies based upon reason rather than fear.

Adios USSR; Hola Terrorista

When I was a boy, we were taught to hide under our desks for fear of Russian bombs. And while it’s true the USSR was an evil empire, it wasn’t true they wanted to nuke my home town. Yet that fear remained and was stoked, because it worked.

But the evil empire went away, and the fear of nuclear incineration with it. Partly as a result, we were told by our 1990s figurehead, “The era of big government is over.” Mindless sacrifice in fear of the nuking Russians was gone, and public rhetoric had to be pulled back.

But then, a scant 10 years later, a new fear came screaming across our TV screens. However it came about, 9-11 restored fear to the Western mind. And with fear came another wave of unreasoned compliance. If people had been thinking, they would have made counter-arguments like this one:

Wait… We’ve been spending hundreds of billions of dollars to prevent just this sort of thing, and it failed spectacularly. Shall we now simply reward and expand the system that failed?

Or like this:

We’re told that the various protector agencies knew about this plan shaping up, but they didn’t share information with each other… something they were already required to do. So, the answer is to create another agency? Is there any sane reason to think that they won’t exhibit the same bureaucratic disease?

I could go on, but you get the idea. The vile PATRIOT Act was hustled into effect while the masses were afraid. After that, they had either to defend it or admit they got suckered. And so, since most people hate admitting their errors, they’d defended it.

So, we lost the Soviets, but the overlords replaced them with terrorists. The actual threat level represented by terrorism is much, much lower than that presented by the USSR, but we have much better fear delivery systems these days. So the stupidity remains and accomplishes its necessary service to rulership.

The Foundation of Our World

Please consider this statement carefully:

The world we now live in is arranged around our fears and not around our abilities.

I devoted an entire issue of my subscription newsletter to this issue (#74), and I lack space here. But one of the points I made in that issue was this:

The dominant systems in our world are built upon primitive and low aspects of human nature. They are incarnations of fear and took their shape by about 4000 BC. It’s ridiculous to organize ourselves the same way as people who used stone tools.

So, Could the Elites Survive?

In a word, no. The elites who rule our world from behind the scenes couldn’t continue as they are, without terrorism or some equally telegenic replacement. They must keep fear alive.

And please remember this: Any time someone tries to make you afraid, they’re hacking your brain.

We can do better.

* * * * *

A book that generates comments like these, from actual readers, might be worth your time:

  • I just finished reading The Breaking Dawn and found it to be one of the most thought-provoking, amazing books I have ever read… It will be hard to read another book now that I’ve read this book… I want everyone to read it.

  • Such a tour de force, so many ideas. And I am amazed at the courage to write such a book, that challenges so many people’s conceptions.

  • There were so many points where it was hard to read, I was so choked up.

  • Holy moly! I was familiar with most of the themes presented in A Lodging of Wayfaring Men, but I am still trying to wrap my head around the concepts you presented at the end of this one.

Get it at Amazon ($18.95) or on Kindle: ($5.99)

TheBreakingDawn

* * * * *

Paul Rosenberg
www.freemansperspective.com